Health profile of a Queenslander

The health of Queenslanders is generally very good. However, chronic diseases such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes and respiratory disease cut short the lives of far too many people.

A comparison of the risk factors for chronic disease among the average Queensland male and female provides strong reasons for changes in lifestyle.

The average Queensland male

The average Queensland female

Life expectancy

79 years

(69 years if he is Indigenous)

Life expectancy

84 years

(75 years if she is Indigenous)

Weight

65% are overweight or obese.

(If he is Indigenous, he is even more likely to be overweight or obese.)

Weight

51% are overweight or obese.

(If she is Indigenous, she is more likely to be overweight or obese.)

Fruit consumption

50%

eat the recommended 2 serves of fruit each day.

Fruit consumption

58%

eat the recommended 2 serves of fruit each day.

Vegetable consumption

7% of Queensland men eat the recommended intake of 6 serves of vegetables daily.

Vegetable consumption

13% of women eat the recommended intake of 5 serves of vegetables daily.

Physical activity

Only 60% are doing enough physical activity for health benefits (but he is not as active as he thinks).

Physical activity

Only half (53%) are doing enough activity to make a difference to their health (but her activity levels have improved over the years).

Tobacco smoking

He could be a smoker—1 in 6 men are smokers. Men are 20% more likely to be daily smokers than women (lung cancer is a major cause of cancer deaths in men).

Tobacco smoking

She may be one of the 1 in 6 women who smoke during pregnancy (or she may be one of the 1 in 2 Indigenous women who do).

Harmful levels of alcohol consumption

24% drink more than 4 drinks on any one occasion each week, putting them at risk of an alcohol related injury.

Harmful levels of alcohol consumption

7% drink more than 4 drinks on any one occasion each week, putting them at risk of an alcohol related injury.

Sun exposure

57% have been sunburnt in the past 12 months—melanoma is the 4th highest cause of death from cancer in males.

Sun exposure

There is a 46% chance that she has been sunburnt in the past 12 months, despite sun exposure being a known high-risk factor for melanoma.

Leading causes of

death for men are:

• diseases of the circulatory system

• cancer and respiratory disease (including coronary heart disease, stroke, dementia and lung cancer).

Leading causes of

death for women are:

• diseases of the circulatory system

• cancer and respiratory disease (including coronary heart disease, stroke, dementia and breast cancer).

Mental wellbeing

Suicides are nearly 3 times more common in males than females. Men are more likely than women to report ever having a mental disorder—1 in 3 compared to 1 in 5 for women.

Mental wellbeing

She could be one of the 21% of women who have a mental disorder and have experienced symptoms in the last 12 months. About 1 in 8 women report high levels of psychological distress (using a standard measure).

Outlook

If he is from an area with lower income and education levels, he is much more likely to have health problems and die younger. This is the same for women.

He is much more likely to die from heart disease than females and at a younger age. Despite improvements in treatment and reductions in death rates from cardiovascular disease in recent years, it is still the biggest killer of men followed by cancer.

Outlook

If she is from an area with lower income and education levels, she is much more likely to have health problems and die younger. This is the same for men.

If she doesn’t watch her eating habits and be more active, she is a strong candidate for diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and even depression. Despite improvements in treatment and reductions in death rates from cardiovascular disease in recent years, it is still the biggest killer of women followed by cancer.

 

See Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service

Please note: this initiative was previously known as Workplaces for Wellness. For a short period, many resources will still refer to Workplaces for Wellness.